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This is an open letter by the first U.S. LGBTQI delegation to Palestine. It was composed after the delegation returned from their solidarity tour in the West Bank and Israel in January 2012. It is a letter worth reading and a petition worth signing. If you are a queer person or ally interested in standing in solidarity with the people of Palestine and Palestinian queers, please sign!

Filed under picture not mine solidarity activism petition Palestine occupied Palestine Israel zionism United States queer queers against apartheid lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi pinkwashing pink washing not in our name important solidarity activism this queer is for justice in palestine Gaza Gaza Strip West Bank

646 notes

anotherfeminist:

applesarefuckinghealthy:

youcouldfakeamelody:

takenoverbyrocknroll:

justaguywitharrows:

Do you see this?
Do you see the number of things that are WRONG with this?
The fake slur, the beat up face, the TAG LINE. 
You know what this movie is? It’s speaking to every single fucking straightie (yes I just made that word up and it implies exactly the correct tone of condescension that I need right now) who feels ~*so*~ oppressed by queer people, ~*so victimized*~, and most importantly so threatened by our existence, by our refusal to shut up, by our refusal to disappear, by our insistence on our rights, by our celebration of ourselves. Well fuck you. 
And don’t even get me started on the tag line. “How would you live if you couldn’t love?” I wonder— OH WAIT. OH. FUCKING. WAIT. WOW. GEE. I JUST HAVE NO IDEA IT’S NOT LIKE THAT’S ACTUALLY HAPPENING RIGHT NOW TO REAL PEOPLE. 
Fuck. 
I’m so fucking incensed. Maybe you should feel threatened. Maybe queer people are coming for you. We’re coming for your cushy straight heteronormative lifestyle and nothing about your shitty world is ever going to be the same. 

This is the summary according to IMDB:
Love is All You Need? tells the story of Ashley, a young teen who is raised in the picture perfect all-American family with two moms, two grandpas, two uncles, and a little brother. But Ashley has a problem, she has a crush on a boy at school, which is against everything this world has ever taught her. This undeniable attraction to the opposite sex causes her to be the constant target of verbal and physical abuse until she is driven to a tragic end. This film hopes to shed light onto the highly controversial issue of human and equal rights in the LBGT Community, and also raise awareness to our current world as to the obstacles that this community faces.

I just love reading the comments from people who are flipping shit because they didn’t take the time to see what it’s actually trying to do…

lol no do not talk down to all of us who are angry about this
instead take a seat and think about what you’re saying
the way they are going to get straight people to care about the gsm communities
is to recast themselves as victims
make the abused into abusers
oppressed into oppressors
appropriate our stories as their stories?????
instead of you know actually shooting a movie about actual queer people????

I have mixed feelings about this. Looks interesting, but I gotta say something hurt inside when the trailer introduces us into this alternate universe in which “GAY is NORMAL”. I know homosexuality is not the norm in our current society and maybe that’s why they chose to use that word… but that doesn’t mean I don’t feel anything when gay is adressed as something unusual.

applesarefuckinghealthy said it all. 
This movie is not being made in order to educate straight people on queer issues. And it sure as fuck isn’t being made for the queer community. 
Straight people do not get to come in and appropriate my experiences or the experiences of anyone else in the queer community and then call it education. You don’t get to watch this fucking movie and then pat yourself on the back for being a good ally.
Any straight person who can watch this movie without throwing something at the screen or puking is no fucking ally of mine. 

anotherfeminist:

applesarefuckinghealthy:

youcouldfakeamelody:

takenoverbyrocknroll:

justaguywitharrows:

Do you see this?

Do you see the number of things that are WRONG with this?

The fake slur, the beat up face, the TAG LINE. 

You know what this movie is? It’s speaking to every single fucking straightie (yes I just made that word up and it implies exactly the correct tone of condescension that I need right now) who feels ~*so*~ oppressed by queer people, ~*so victimized*~, and most importantly so threatened by our existence, by our refusal to shut up, by our refusal to disappear, by our insistence on our rights, by our celebration of ourselves. Well fuck you. 

And don’t even get me started on the tag line. “How would you live if you couldn’t love?” I wonder— OH WAIT. OH. FUCKING. WAIT. WOW. GEE. I JUST HAVE NO IDEA IT’S NOT LIKE THAT’S ACTUALLY HAPPENING RIGHT NOW TO REAL PEOPLE. 

Fuck. 

I’m so fucking incensed. Maybe you should feel threatened. Maybe queer people are coming for you. We’re coming for your cushy straight heteronormative lifestyle and nothing about your shitty world is ever going to be the same. 

This is the summary according to IMDB:

Love is All You Need? tells the story of Ashley, a young teen who is raised in the picture perfect all-American family with two moms, two grandpas, two uncles, and a little brother. But Ashley has a problem, she has a crush on a boy at school, which is against everything this world has ever taught her. This undeniable attraction to the opposite sex causes her to be the constant target of verbal and physical abuse until she is driven to a tragic end. This film hopes to shed light onto the highly controversial issue of human and equal rights in the LBGT Community, and also raise awareness to our current world as to the obstacles that this community faces.

I just love reading the comments from people who are flipping shit because they didn’t take the time to see what it’s actually trying to do…

lol no do not talk down to all of us who are angry about this

instead take a seat and think about what you’re saying

the way they are going to get straight people to care about the gsm communities

is to recast themselves as victims

make the abused into abusers

oppressed into oppressors

appropriate our stories as their stories?????

instead of you know actually shooting a movie about actual queer people????

I have mixed feelings about this. Looks interesting, but I gotta say something hurt inside when the trailer introduces us into this alternate universe in which “GAY is NORMAL”. I know homosexuality is not the norm in our current society and maybe that’s why they chose to use that word… but that doesn’t mean I don’t feel anything when gay is adressed as something unusual.

applesarefuckinghealthy said it all. 

This movie is not being made in order to educate straight people on queer issues. And it sure as fuck isn’t being made for the queer community. 

Straight people do not get to come in and appropriate my experiences or the experiences of anyone else in the queer community and then call it education. You don’t get to watch this fucking movie and then pat yourself on the back for being a good ally.

Any straight person who can watch this movie without throwing something at the screen or puking is no fucking ally of mine. 

(Source: missivesfromghosts)

Filed under rage heterosexuals you need to fucking check yourselves queer lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi film

916 notes

sqs-tec:

A Pride comic from Van: 
This is my small contribution to Pride Month. I feel like Pride (at least here) is very LGB centered. This is our month too! And let us never forget the fierce trans* women of color that led the movement! And all other gender nonconforming individuals there.Sylvia Rivera is my hero.
Go out and celebrate the past, present, and future of our community.

sqs-tec:

A Pride comic from Van: 

This is my small contribution to Pride Month. 

I feel like Pride (at least here) is very LGB centered. This is our month too! 

And let us never forget the fierce trans* women of color that led the movement! And all other gender nonconforming individuals there.

Sylvia Rivera is my hero.

Go out and celebrate the past, present, and future of our community.

(via youreatransmisogynistwhen)

Filed under lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi pride month

4,872 notes

glaad:

Violence Against Transgender People and People of Color is Disproportionately High, LGBTQH Murder Rate Peaks
The murder rate of people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and HIV-affected (LGBTQH) is at its highest, according to a recently released 2011 report from the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP). The report also shows that transgender women, people of color, and youth and young adults are at a disproportionately high risk of being victims of what the NCAVP terms hate violence.
PLEASE SHARE.

glaad:

Violence Against Transgender People and People of Color is Disproportionately High, LGBTQH Murder Rate Peaks

The murder rate of people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and HIV-affected (LGBTQH) is at its highest, according to a recently released 2011 report from the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP). The report also shows that transgender women, people of color, and youth and young adults are at a disproportionately high risk of being victims of what the NCAVP terms hate violence.

PLEASE SHARE.

(via sanityscraps)

Filed under lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi lesbian gay bisexual trans* rage qpoc queer tw: murder violence hate crimes

1,607 notes

queerandpresentdanger:

pleakleyispretty:

dearjimmoriarty:

bittergrapes:

ad-mirandam:

(z) In which I weep for humanity…

Yeeeeep that’s right folks! Doesn’t matter that people are homeless and DYING as long as a certain group within the community gets to marry!!!!

You see, marriage is a magic institution that solves everything!
Hmmm, where have I heard that before?

If you see nothing wrong with this, I don’t know what to tell you…

It’s not surprising the two with the most mainstream media coverage are the highest. Gross.

queerandpresentdanger:

pleakleyispretty:

dearjimmoriarty:

bittergrapes:

ad-mirandam:

(z) In which I weep for humanity…

Yeeeeep that’s right folks! Doesn’t matter that people are homeless and DYING as long as a certain group within the community gets to marry!!!!

You see, marriage is a magic institution that solves everything!

Hmmm, where have I heard that before?

If you see nothing wrong with this, I don’t know what to tell you…

It’s not surprising the two with the most mainstream media coverage are the highest. Gross.

(Source: megidophilia)

Filed under lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi queer activism rage critical thinking ugh poll huffington post

7,440 notes

so-treu:

trubr0wn:

widdershinsgirl:

littlemisslillykat:

homosexualintellectual:

Trans* rights in the United States. See a problem here?

& This is why I wont move off the west coast!

Nor I out of Minnesota!!!

just in case you folks don’t quite understand the implications of “employment discrimination” and “housing discrimination” i will break it down for you:

it means you can be FIRED from your job, no matter HOW long you’ve been working there or how great an employee you are, for NO other reason, and it means you can be KICKED OUT OF YOUR HOUSE AND/OR EVICTED for NO OTHER REASON. it means you can be DENIED a job SOLELY because you are trans* and it means you can be denied a home SOLELY because you are trans*. and it is COMPLETELY LEGAL.

mass only recently ended this with the trans* rights bill we passed just a few months ago.

i hope you understand that the legal sanctioning of stripping BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS from trans* people is DIRECTLY CORRELATED with the outrageously high homelessness and SUICIDE rates of trans* people. THIS is part of why over 50% of trans* people UNDER 20 have attempted suicide, many successfully. 50 FUCKING PERCENT.

this is not just discrimination. this is STRIPPING people of their HUMANITY and ENDORSING their deaths. this is borderline LEGAL GENOCIDE.

why i’m not at all impressed w/ Obama’s “groundbreaking” stance on gay marriage.

(Source: queerpunkhamlet, via socialistexan)

Filed under discrimination trans* trans* rights lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi queer activism important trans* people

261 notes

I finally figured out a term for this

queerandpresentdanger:

ceepolk:

dolgematki:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

You know how white liberal people are so quick to support gay marriage, but then they completely ignore things like violence against GSM people of color, or higher rates of GSM youth incarceration, abuse, and homelessness, or there being no legal protections for being fired or evicted for being gay or non-binary?

TRICKLE DOWN JUSTICE

Like I believe marriage is important— especially the legal protections and privileges it comes with. But when people are regularly dying and being abused because they are not hetero or cisgender, and no one wants to talk about it…that’s Trickle Down Justice. Because the impression is that getting this one single goal will suddenly make things better, and that these are the only “rights” people need to fight for. We don’t want to be critical of our society and how things like race, gender, and class affect how a trans person of color is treated. Or how there are a ton of homeless Queer youth. Or how marriage in general is still very flawed and assimilationist.

We don’t want to admit that this “big step” we are fighting for is only really going to help a small subset of the actual LGBT population.

This is something to think about.

…Trickle Down Justice

That’s perfect

and the comparison to urine doesn’t even miss a beat

Dean Spade actually has a really great theory about this called Trickle-Up Social Justice (link is to video)

Filed under critical thinking important lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi marriage equality politics intersting important opinions things to think about assimilation trickle down justice queer

3 notes

All I wanna do is walk around my house and eat ice cream and shout about intersectionality and the queer community and how much I love being queer and queer people and be angry and maybe cry about how we are not valued as human beings.  

But I can’t because my grandma is here visiting and she’s homophobic and racist and doesn’t know I’m queer. 

So. 

Filed under brb self loathing only a little though queer fuck North Carolina North Carolina marriage equality lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi activism same sex marriage marriage United States

12 notes

“Pinkwashing” is the appropriation of queer voices in order to shift focus from human rights and international law violations committed by the State of Israel, to an image of Israel as progressive, tolerant and ‘gay-friendly.’

This Pinkwashing Kit is meant to inform and guide you through understanding this particular Israeli PR technique, its backing narrative, goals and tactics, and most importantly how it can be countered effectively.

In this Kit, you will find a collection of materials put together for the purpose of making clear, factual information about pinkwashing accessible and available to a wider international audience. It also aims to serve as a base for the exchange of information and ideas about pinkwashing and counter-pinkwashing. It allows activists and organizations to learn from each others’ campaigns and create efficient mechanisms of resistance to pinkwashing.

This kit is intended to be used by students, activists, and organizations and for anyone else interested in learning about pinkwashing. The documents complement each other, but we encourage users to pick and choose specific documents that prove more relevant to their campaigns.

As a collaboration between alQaws, pinkwatchingisrael.com, and PQBDS, this kit is a first attempt at making sense and keeping track of pinkwashing and counter-pinkwashing. It is the result of a great deal of activist research and planning, and we invite other groups or individuals with up-to-date information to contribute to the growth of this project. All contributions are appreciated, but we are especially interested in visual, audio and video materials.

We hope this kit will be useful as it stands and also as a starting point for a much larger collection of documents and an interactive center of information exchange. We are awaiting your contributions, ideas, and questions concerning pinkwashing and the struggle against it, and look forward to where this all will lead.

PinkwatchIsrael.com (via hummussexual)

Filed under pinkwashing Palestine occupied Palestine Israel zionism queer lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi critical thinking pinkwashing kit United States

3 notes

winnipegasparadigm:

yoyo, M sent me this video. While I have reservations about some of the angles (listing T for trans but never discussing it, “coloured people”?!), it seems worthy regardless. Transcript, emphasiseseses added:

Hi, I’m Katherine Franke from Columbia Law School, and I’m sorry I can’t join you today in person at the Equality Forum’s panel on legal issues, I want to thank you for indulging my presence by video.

As you no doubt know, the Equality Forum has chosen Israel as it’s featured nation this year, and for that reason I thought this was a good opportunity to talk a little bit about the state of gay rights in Israel/Palestine. Last January, I was part of the first lgbtq delegation to the West Bank – 16 of us, academics, artists, journalists, community leaders, and even a lesbian rabbi – visited Palestine and Israel in order to get a first hand sense of lesbian, gay, trans and queer politics in the region. While we were there Tel Aviv was voted in poll to be the “world’s best gay city.” Lesbians and gay men have been openly serving in the Israeli military for years, same-sex couples’ marriages have been recognized by the state for some time, and Israel has much better sexual orientation discrimination laws than we do. The Israeli Ambassador to the U.S. Michael Oren often notes that, in his words: Israel “provides shelter to Palestinian homosexuals seeking safety from Islamists in the West Bank.”

Given all of this, I was really curious to hear what queer Palestinians had to say about the struggles they face. I met with Israeli gay activists in Tel Aviv, as well as the members of Al Qaws, the Palestinian lgbtq group based in Ramallah, and Aswat, an organization of Palestinian lesbians who are citizens of Israel and is located in Haifa. What they told us, and what I witnessed, complicated the story of gay rights in the region considerably. Here are some highlights of what I learned:

While Tel Aviv may have a hot and hunky gay bar scene – the tolerance or acceptance of homosexuality is not as common elsewhere in the country. Israel, like the U.S. is a complex place, and is increasingly religiously conservative – in fact when I was in Jerusalem I saw that many of the public busses are now sex segregated, men sitting in front, women in the back, and in one Jerusalem neighborhood women are banned from walking on the main streets entirely so as to avoid men having contact with them. A recent report documented that almost half of the out gays and lesbians serving in the Israeli military have been sexually harassed by other servicemembers, and a member of the Knesset and Education Minister recently said that gays “are not people like everyone else,” that we are an abomination. Ambassador Oren was mistaken when he said that Israel gives asylum to gay and lesbian Palestinians. Israel does not grant asylum to any Palestinians, regardless of their sexual orientation, and in fact won’t even let an Israeli who marries a Palestinian share their Israeli citizenship with their spouse. Tel Aviv may have a great gay scene, but most Palestinians will never see it since, regardless of their sexual orientation, because they are not allowed to pass through the checkpoints and the Wall to enter Israel from the West Bank.

What I learned from the queer Palestinians I met was that gay rights organizing in Palestine has to be understood within the context of the Israeli occupation. The Occupation is a totalizing experience – permeating all parts of life for Palestinians. It is impossible for them to isolate their gay or lesbian selves for special legal and political treatment, but rather the fight for sexual rights is part of a larger struggle for Palestinian self-determination and freedom. Let me give you a particularly salient example: Since 2000 Shin Bet, the Israeli security service, has had a policy of blackmailing Palestinians who are gay or who are perceived to be gay and threatening to out them unless they become informants against their own people. For this reason, gay people in Palestine have a reputation as collaborators with Israel – so some of the homophobia gays and lesbians in Palestine experience is the direct product of the occupation itself.

The Palestinian queers I met made clear that the last thing they want is to be rescued “as gays and lesbians” by the international human rights community. In a region that’s already so defined by identity-based binaries, such as Israeli/Palestinian, Jew/Arab, peaceful/terrorist etc, to introduce another identitiarian form of politics, gay/straight, is dangerous and does a kind of violence precisely to the people the “gay rights” movement wants to help. The see their work as necessarily queer in so far as they are seeking to break down these binaries in favor of a kind of shared humanity, and shared territory that isn’t split up based on identity. I found the Wall to be an incredible metaphor for the way people and land are separated from one another based on identity.

The last thing I want to say is to explain why I’m not attending the panel today. You may or may not know that the Equality Forum has come under strong criticism for its selection of Israel as it’s featured nation, and particularly its selection of Michael Oren as the keynote speaker. Palestinian Queers for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions of Israel, or PQBDS, has urged the gay community in the U.S. to become more aware of how we have become an unwitting partner in Israel’s efforts to improve its much-criticized human rights record – especially with respect to the Palestinians. Through a policy that some have called “pinkwashing,” Israel has self-consciously sought to rebrand itself as less religious, less militaristic and less hostile to its neighbors, and in so doing wants to deflect attention from the International Court of Justice and UN Human Rights Council’s findings that many of Israel’s policies with respect to the Palestinians violate international law. Through events such as the Equality Forum’s celebration of Israel this week they have enjoined the U.S. gay rights community to become cheerleaders for Israel. It’s one thing to express our solidarity with gays and lesbians in another country such as Israel, it’s quite another to become pawns in that country’s foreign policy strategy.

While it may seem natural for gays to side with Israel, after all they have such good gay rights laws, this support reflects a major weakness of so many human rights movements that tend to prioritize their own struggles without considering the ways in which all forms of discrimination are linked. In Israel/Palestine gay rights and human rights more broadly are necessarily connected to one another, and treating one domestic minority well does not excuse or diminish the immorality of the state’s other rights- abridging policies. Had South Africa enacted good gay rights laws during the Apartheid era no one would have seen that as excusing their treatment of black and colored people. For this reason I have chosen to honor PQBDS’s request that we boycott the Equality Forum.

To uncritically celebrate Israel at a conference organized around notions of equality and liberty, and have Michael Oren serve as the keynote speaker at the “international equality dinner,” is taken as a slap in the face by our queer brothers and sisters in Palestine as well as by the queers within Israel who are actively seeking a just resolution of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. By avoiding any programming that offered a balanced view of the human rights record of its “featured nation” the Equality Forum lost an important opportunity to be a leader in the international gay human rights movement, and instead allowed itself to be used as a part of Israel’s larger efforts to deflect criticisms of its human rights record.

I say these things mindful that when I have talked in other venues about our trip in January and have tried to paint a picture of the complexity of gay rights in the region my comments have been met with some of the most intense criticism in my career – I have discovered how hard it is to express any criticism of Israeli state policy or any sympathy toward the plight of the Palestinians without being called anti-semitic. There must be some room in our community to have a mindful and critical conversation about the politics of this region that does not get immediately labeled racist or hateful. While not all of you may want to support the BDS movement as I have, I do hope you’ll take the time to learn more about al Qaws, Aswat, PQBDS, and attend the panel on lgbtq rights in the region being held at 3:00 tomorrow at the William Way Community Center.

Thank you.

Fucking blackmail, eh? UGH

Filed under Palestine occupied Palestine Israel zionism United States queer lgbt lgbtq lgbtqi homosexuality sexuality critical thinking politics things to think about important opinions things to consider interesting pink washing pinkwashing